Famous electric guitar makers

Fender Esquire 1st prototype in 1949 at Fender Guitar Factory museum
First Fender Esquire 1949
Thе еlесtrіс guitar саmе іntо еxіѕtеnсе mаіnlу bесаuѕе thе dеѕіrе tо have “louder muѕіс” wаѕ іn the fоrеfrоnt of the mіnd of mаnу of the guіtаr mаkеrѕ. It was thе 1920’s when dance muѕіс bесаmе more popular. Althоugh dіffеrеnt from whаt dаnсе muѕіс іѕ tоdау, іt was thе height of thе flapper gіrlѕ and the сlub scene and еvеrуоnе wаntеd thеіr muѕіс lоud but weren’t ѕurе hоw tо dо іt. Thе соnсеrt settings wеrе becoming lаrgеr аѕ wеll аnd еvеn muѕісіаnѕ wаntеd lоudеr and more powerful instruments. You соuld ѕее the guіtаrѕ сhаngіng іn style wіth nеw tесhnоlоgу tо gеt the larger ѕоundѕ but nо оnе hаd уеt thоught tо аmрlіfу thе instrument іtѕеlf.

Bеfоrе thе іnnоvаtіоn hарреnеd thоugh уоu саn trace thе nееd fоr еlесtrіс guіtаrѕ bасk wеll bеfоrе the 20th century. Arоund 1800 thе Spanish style 6-string was іntrоduсеd whісh was already lоudеr thаn рrеvіоuѕlу made instruments. It was the 1850’ѕ thаt thе bоdу wаѕ reinforced and thе guіtаr bеgаn tо have a flat-top design to іt. In 1890, Orville Gіbѕоn саmе оut wіth a саrvеd bоdу axe that mаdе іt even lоudеr аnd set ѕtаndаrdѕ fоr thе futurе аrсh top model.

Thеn you gоt tо thе 1920’ѕ whеn the needs intensified. Wіth bіg band music and соmmеrсіаl radio, еvеrуоnе wаѕ trying to thіnk оf the next great guіtаr іnvеntіоn. Some соmраnіеѕ decided to gо wіth larger ѕіzеѕ аnd metal bоdіеѕ, but thе true modern іnvеntоrѕ started tо focus оn еlесtrісіtу to make thеm lоudеr. John Dopyera wеnt оnе bеttеr аnd designed a ѕtееl body guitar wіth a rеѕоnаtоr аmрlіfіеr thаt was similar tо whаt уоu could fіnd wіth banjos аt thе tіmе. It was buіlt іntо thе tор оf the body.

Thеn in 1923 Llоуd Loar, an еngіnееr who worked wіth Adolph Rісkеnbасkеr, dеvеlореd a рісkuр that sensed thе vіbrаtіоnѕ іn thе ѕоundbоаrd of many dіffеrеnt ѕtrіng іnѕtrumеntѕ. Rісkеnbасkеr іѕ ѕоmеtіmеѕ said tо be thе оnе that rеаllу wаѕ behind the manufacturing оf thе electric guіtаr, because hе еԛuірреd іt with tungѕtеn pickups but іt rеаllу іѕ uр tо dеbаtе as tо whісh was thе асtuаl fіrѕt еlесtrіс model.

Then іn 1931 George Bеаuсhаmр сrеаtеd аn electromagnetic рісkuр whісh сrеаtеd a fіеld whісh amplified thе ѕtrіngѕ movements аnd vіbrаtіоnѕ. It wаѕ a ѕіmрlе іnvеntіоn thаt іnсludеd a current раѕѕіng through a соіl оf wіrе wrapped аrоund a mаgnеt. It was known as thе “Frуіng Pаn” guitar. Thіѕ was thе fіrѕt соmmеrсіаl electric model thаt was uѕеаblе by the соmmоn player.

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The original Woodstock festival in the 60s

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was an event held at Max Yasgur’s 600 acre (2.4 km²) dairy farm in the rural town of Bethel, New York from August 15 to August 18, 1969. For many, it exemplified the counterculture of the 1960s and the “hippie era.” Many of the best-known musicians of the time appeared during the rainy weekend, captured in a successful 1970 movie, Woodstock. Joni Mitchell’s song “Woodstock,” which memorialized the event, became a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Though attempts have been made over the years to recreate the festival, the original Woodstock festival of 1969 has proven to be unique and legendary.

Woodstock 1999
Fans at the East stage at Woodstock 99 in Rome, New York. The Woodstock 99 festival will feature over 45 bands on four stages on July 23,24,and 25th. Crowd estimate for the first day was 250,000. (Photo by Frank Micelotta/ImageDirect)

Woodstock has been idealized in the American popular culture as the culmination of the hippie movement. – What started as a paid event ended being free with over 500,000 attendees or flower children. Although the festival was remarkably peaceful given the number of people and conditions involved, the reality was less than perfect. Woodstock did have some crime and other misbehavior, as well as a fatality from a drug overdose, an accidental death caused by an occupied sleeping bag being run over by a tractor and one participant died from falling off a scaffold. There were also three miscarriages and two births recorded at the event and colossal logistical headaches. Furthermore, because Woodstock was not intended for such a large crowd, there were not enough resources such as portable toilets and first-aid tents. As a matter of fact the original plan for holding the festival in Wallkill, NY was scrapped because the town officially banned it on the grounds that the planned portable toilets wouldn’t meet town code. Maybe they would have preferred full bathroom suites.

There was some profiteering in the sale of “electric Kool-Aid.”

Woodstock began as a profit-making venture; it only became a free festival after it became obvious that the concert was drawing hundreds of thousands more people than the organizers had prepared for, and that the fence had been torn down by eager, unticketed arrivals. Tickets for the event (sold in 1969) cost US $18 to buy a ticket in advance (which would be US$95.58 in 2005 with inflation factored in) and $24 to buy a ticket at the gate for all three days. Ticket sales were limited to record stores in the greater New York City area, or by mail via a Post Office Box at the Radio City Station Post Office located in Midtown Manhattan.

Yet, in tune with the idealistic hopes of the 1960s, Woodstock satisfied most attendees. Especially memorable were the sense of social harmony, the quality of music, and the overwhelming mass of people, many sporting bohemian dress, behavior, and attitudes

Performers and Schedule of Events

Friday, August 15
The first day, which officially began at 5:08 p.m. with Richie Havens, featured folk artists.

Richie Havens (opened the festival – performed 7 encores)


High Flyin’ Bird
I Can’t Make It Anymore
With A Little Help w/ me
Strawberry Fields Forever
Hey Jude
I Had A Woman
Handsome Johnny
Freedom/Motherless Child
Swami Satchidananda – gave the invocation for the festival
Country Joe McDonald, played separate set from his band, The Fish
I Find Myself Missing You
Rockin All Around The World
Flyin’ High All Over the World
Seen A Rocket flyin
The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag
John Sebastian
How Have You Been
Rainbows Over Your Blues
I Had A Dream
Younger Generation
Sweetwater
What’s Wrong
Motherless Child
Look Out
For Pete’s Sake
Day Song
Crystal Spider
Two Worlds
Why Oh Why
Incredible String Band
Invocation
The Letter
This Moment
When You Find Out Who You Are
Bert Sommer
Jennifer
The Road To Travel
I Wondered Where You Be
She’s Gone
Things Are Going my Way
And When It’s Over
Jeanette
America
A Note That Read
Smile
Tim Hardin, an hour-long set
If I Were A Carpenter
Misty Roses
Ravi Shankar, with a 5-song set, played through the rain
Raga Puriya-Dhanashri/Gat In Sawarital
Tabla Solo In Jhaptal
Raga Manj Kmahaj
Iap Jor
Dhun In Kaharwa Tal
Melanie
Beautiful People
Birthday of The Sun
Arlo Guthrie
Coming Into Los Angeles
Walking Down The Line
Amazing Grace
Joan Baez
Oh Happy Day
The Last Thing On My Mind
I Shall Be Released
Joe Hill
Sweet Sir Galahad
Hickory Wind
Drug Store Truck Driving Man
(I Live) One Day at a Time
Sweet Sunny South
Warm and Tender Love
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
We Shall Overcome
Baez Source: Arthur Levy, annotator of the expanded editions of the 12 Joan Baez CDs on Vanguard

Saturday, August 16
The day opened at 12:15 pm, and featured some of the event’s biggest psychedelic and guitar rock headliners.

Quill, forty minute set of four songs
They Live the Life
BBY
Waitin’ For You
Jam
Keef Hartley Band
Spanish Fly
Believe In You
Rock Me Baby
Medley
Leavin’ fuct
Halfbreed
Just To Cry
Sinnin’ For You
Santana
Waiting
You Just Don’t Care
Savior
Jingo
Persuasion
Soul Sacrifice
Fried Neckbones
Canned Heat
A Change Is Gonna Come/Leaving This Town
Going Up The Country
Let’s Work Together
Woodstock Boogie
Mountain, hour-long set including Jack Bruce’s “Theme For An Imaginary Western”
Blood of the Sun
Stormy Monday
Long Red
Who Am I But You And The Sun
Beside The Sea
For Yasgur’s Farm (then untitled)
You and Me
Theme For An Imaginary Western
Waiting To Take You Away
Dreams of Milk and Honey
Blind Man
Blue Suede Shoes
Southbound Train
Janis Joplin (Performed 2 encores; Piece of My Heart and Ball and Chain).
Raise Your Hand
As Good As You’ve Been To This World
To Love Somebody
Summertime
Try (Just A Little Bit Harder)
Kosmic Blues
Can’t Turn you Loose
Work Me Lord
Piece of My Heart
Ball and Chain
Sly & the Family Stone started at 1:30 am
M’Lady
Sing A Simple Song
You Can Make It If You Try
Everyday People
Dance To The Music
I Want To Take You Higher
Love City
Stand!
Grateful Dead
St. Stephen
Mama Tried
Dark Star/High Time
Turn On Your Love Light
Creedence Clearwater Revival
Born on the Bayou
Green River
Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won’t Do)
Commotion
Bootleg
Bad Moon Rising
Proud Mary
I Put A Spell On You
Night Time is the Right Time
Keep On Chooglin’
Suzy Q
The Who began at 3 AM, kicking off a 24-song set including Tommy
Heaven and Hell
I Can’t Explain
It’s a Boy
1921
Amazing Journey
Sparks
Eyesight to the Blind
Christmas
Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Acid Queen
Pinball Wizard
Fiddle About
There’s a Doctor
Go to the Mirror
Smash the Mirror
I’m Free
Tommy’s Holiday Camp
We’re Not Gonna Take It
See Me, Feel Me
Summertime Blues
Shakin’ All Over
My Generation
Naked Eye
Jefferson Airplane began at 8 a.m. with an eight-song set, capping off the overnight marathon.
Volunteers
Somebody To Love
The Other Side of This Life
Plastic Fantastic Lover
Won’t You Try/Saturday Afternoon
Eskimo Blue Day
Uncle Sam’s Blues
White Rabbit

Sunday, August 17 to Monday, August 18

Joe Cocker was the first act on the last officially booked day (Sunday); he opened up for the day’s booked acts at 2 PM. The day’s events ultimately drove the schedule nine hours late. By dawn, the concert was continuing in spite of attendees’ having left, returning to the workweek and their other normal obligations.

Joe Cocker
Delta Lady
Some Things Goin’ On
Let’s Go Get Stoned
I Shall Be Released
With a Little Help from My Friends
After Joe Cocker’s set, a storm disrupted the events for several hours.
Country Joe and the Fish resumed the concert around 6 p.m.
Rock and Soul Music
Thing Called Love
Love Machine
The “Fish” Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag
Ten Years After
Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes
I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always
Hear Me Calling
I’m Going Home
The Band – Set list confirmed via Levon Helm’s book “This Wheel’s On Fire”
Chest Fever
Tears of Rage
We Can Talk
Don’t You Tell Henry
Don’t Do It
Ain’t No More Cane
Long Black Veil
This Wheel’s On Fire
I Shall Be Released
The Weight
Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
Blood, Sweat and Tears ushered in the midnight hour with five songs.
More and More
I Love You Baby More Than You Ever Know
Spinning Wheel
I Stand Accused
Something Coming On
Johnny Winter featuring Edgar Winter, his brother, on two songs.
Mama, Talk to Your Daughter
To Tell the Truth
Johnny B. Goode
Six Feet In the Ground
Leland Mississippi Blues/Rock Me Baby
Mean Mistreater
I Can’t Stand It (With Edgar Winter)
Tobacco Road (With Edgar Winter)
Mean Town Blues
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young began around 3 a.m. with separate acoustic and electric sets.
Acoustic Set
Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
Blackbird
Helplessly Hoping
Guinnevere
Marrakesh Express
4 + 20
Mr. Soul
Wonderin’
You Don’t Have To Cry
Electric Set
Pre-Road Downs
Long Time Gone
Bluebird
Sea of Madness
Wooden Ships
Find the Cost of Freedom
49 Bye-Byes
Paul Butterfield Blues Band
Everything’s Gonna Be Alright
Driftin’
Born Under A Bad Sign
Morning Sunrise
Love March
Sha-Na-Na
Na Na Theme
Yakety Yak
Teen Angel
Jailhouse Rock
Wipe Out
(Who Wrote) The Book of Love
Duke of Earl
At the Hop
Na Na Theme
Jimi Hendrix had insisted on being the final performer of the festival and was scheduled to perform at midnight. Due to various delays, he did not take the stage until nine o’clock on Monday morning. The crowd, estimated at over 400,000 at its peak, is reported to have been no larger than 80,000 when his performance began. His set lasted two hours — the longest of his career — and featured 17 songs, concluding with “Hey Joe”; but it played to a relatively empty field. The full list of Hendrix’s Woodstock performance repertoire follows:
Message to Love
Hear My Train A Comin’
Spanish Castle Magic
Red House
Mastermind
Lover Man
Foxy Lady
Jam Back At The House
Izabella
Gypsy Woman
Fire
Voodoo Child (Slight Return)/Stepping Stone
Star Spangled Banner
Purple Haze
Woodstock Improvisation
Villanova Junction
Hey Joe

Cancelled appearances

The Jeff Beck Group was scheduled to perform at Woodstock, but failed to make an appearance due to the band’s break-up the week before.

Iron Butterfly was stuck at an airport, and their manager demanded helicopters and special arrangements just for them. They were wired back and told, as impolitely as Western Union would allow, “to get lost”, but in other ‘words’.
Neil Young joined Crosby, Stills & Nash, but refused to be filmed; by his own report, Young felt the filming was distracting both performers and audience from the music. Young’s “Sea of Madness,” heard on the album, was actually recorded a month after the festival at the Fillmore East dance hall.

Joni Mitchell was slated to perform but her agent informed her that it was more important that she appear on “The Dick Cavett Show” on Monday, with its national audience, rather than “sit around in a field with 500 people.” Ironically, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and Jefferson Airplane (who both performed at the festival) also made it to the show. She wrote and recorded the song “Woodstock” that was also a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and was recorded by Richie Havens on his 2004 album Grace of the Sun.

Ethan Brown was a solo guitarist highly admired by the ‘hippie’ youth, but he was arrested three days before the festival on LSD related charges. He is known best for his earlier childhood friendship with The Doors piano player, Ray Manzarek.

Canadian band Lighthouse was originally scheduled to play at Woodstock, but in the end they decided not to, fearing that it would be a bad scene. Later, several members of the group would say that they regretted the decision.

Mind Garage declined for various reasons but one of the primary reasons is that the band had agreed to a paid gig in Cleveland. Had they known that many of their friends were playing at this concert they would have attended. Read the entire story by clicking here.

Refused Invitations

The promoters contacted John Lennon, requesting for The Beatles to perform. Lennon said that he couldn’t get the Beatles, but offered to play with his Plastic Ono Band. The promoters turned this down.

The Doors were considered as a potential performing band, but cancelled at the last moment. Contrary to popular belief that this was related in some fashion to lead singer Jim Morrison’s arrest for indecent exposure while performing earlier that year, the cancellation was most likely due to Morrison’s known and vocal distaste for performing in large outdoor venues.[2] There also was a widely spread legend that Morrison, in a fit of paranoia, was fearful that someone would take a shot at him while he was onstage Drummer John Densmore attended and can be seen on the side of the stage during Joe Cocker’s set.

Led Zeppelin were asked to perform, their manager Peter Grant stating “We were asked to do Woodstock and Atlantic were very keen, and so was our US promoter, Frank Barcelona. I said no because at Woodstock we’d have just been another band on the bill.” “Led Zeppelin: The Concert Files”, Lewis & Pallett, 1997, Omnibus Press, ISBN 0.7119.5307.4

Jethro Tull refused to perform, claiming that it wouldn’t be a big deal.

The Moody Blues for unknown reasons declined to perform. They later regretted not performing. They were however promoted as being a performer on the third day on early posters that stated the site being Wallkill.

Tommy James and the Shondells declined an invitation to perform at Woodstock, which they later regretted. Lead singer Tommy James stated later, “We could have just kicked ourselves. We were in Hawaii, and my secretary called and said, ‘Yeah, listen, there’s this pig farmer in upstate New York that wants you to play in his field.’ That’s how it was put to me. So we passed, and we realized what we’d missed a couple of days later.”

The Clarence White-era Byrds were given an opportunity to play, but refused to do so after a melee during their performance at the Atlanta Pop Festival earlier that summer.

Paul Revere & The Raiders declined to perform. They later regretted.

Bob Dylan was in negotiations to play, however he had to pull out as his son was taken ill. He also was unhappy about the number of the hippies piling up outside his house near the originally planned site. He would go on to perform at the Isle of Wight Festival two weeks later.

Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention Quote: “A lot of mud at Woodstock. We were invited to play there, we turned it down” – FZ. Citation: “Class of the 20th Century,” U.S. network television special in serial format, circa 1995.

Woodstock Trivia

Jimi Hendrix’s E-string broke when he was playing Red House and played the rest of the song with five strings, which was a remarkable feat.

John Sebastian wasn’t originally scheduled to perform. He was enlisted to perform when several of the acts were late in arriving due to the traffic going to the festival.

Richie Havens’s song “Freedom” was totally improvised. He was called back for so many encores that he ran out of songs to sing, so he just picked up his guitar and started singing “Freedom.” The song includes lyrics from the Negro spiritual, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.”

Country Joe McDonald wasn’t scheduled to perform the first day. He was forced into it because many of the acts that were scheduled to perform that day hadn’t arrived yet. He also performed on Day Three with the rest of The Fish.

A 20-year-old man named Stephen Victor Tallarico (later known as Steven Tyler of Aerosmith) attended the festival.

Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young almost didn’t perform at the festival. The helicopter that Graham Nash and the group’s drummer Dallas Taylor were on was less than 25 feet off the ground when the tail rotor failed and it began to spin. The helicopter almost crashed and Nash and Taylor were almost killed.

Michael Lang once said that his original idea was to have Roy Rogers close the festival by singing “Happy Trails.”

The character named “Woodstock” from Peanuts was named for the festival.

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Acoustic Blues Guitar – The Roots Of All Modern Rock Music

Home Made Guitars
Cigar Box Guitars

In the early days, back in the Mississippi Delta, the sons of slaves in the Deep South would often make their own acoustic blues guitars out of an old box, a broom handle and some chicken wire! Needless, to say, they were not the highest quality, but something really big was starting then – blues music. Musical instruments and particularly drums (they spoke of freedom too much) were just not allowed and so the voice was used to express emotion.

Gospel songs were very popular in those days, as were the so-called ‘field-holler’, which was a kind of call and response song that was employed very often to help the work flow of repetitive tasks like sawing or hammering. A good example of this is the Gandy Dancers, which were basically teams of men employed to push heavy steel rails back into place and shore them up again with rubble. One man would lead the song and at the end of each line of verse, the whole team would push, using a long steel bar wedged underneath the rails. It would be a few years yet before the complex fingerstyle guitar of giants like Blind Blake would make their mark, and it was all their own work – there were no blues guitar lessons on the internet!

With the advent of the cheap Stella type guitar marketed at a distance using the Sears catalog, the blues really came into it’s own and many fine classic songs were created. Such men as Big Bill Broonzy, Lightnin’ Hopkins and Blind Blake quickly made the music exciting and in demand as Race Records. A huge turning point came when Muddy Waters took up the electric guitar and pushed Chicago into the next stage of blues guitar, which later was taken up by the Rolling Stones and others to evolve into the rock and roll that we know today.

Much later, young students wanted to play just like the old guys did, searching out acoustic blues guitar lessons from the surviving guitarists, and a revival took place in the 60s, during which time Stefan Grossman and others created a quick way of learning the old blues guitar styles. This new way of learning involved reading blues guitar tablature, a way of writing down where the fingers of both hands should be place to re-create the sounds heard n the classic race records. Many guitarists and teachers today, such as Jim Bruce from the UK, specialize on teaching acoustic style finger picking and offering acoustic guitar lessons on several websites.

http://www.play-blues-guitar.eu/blues-chord-progression.php

Fingerpicking acoustic blues guitar is the basis of all rock music that we hear today and it’s rhythms appear in many classic songs. For example, in the 70s the boogie beat played by Blake, Robert Johnson and others could be heard in dance music created by The BeeGees and other groups. Rural country blues gave way to Broonzy’ swing style Chicago sound, which was transformed by another artist originally from the Southern States, Muddy Waters, and the foundation of electric rock guitar was laid.

The huge range of guitar styles emanating from the Deep South, but also other states such as Texas and South Carolina represented a lot of choice for young guitarists looking for something a little different, while keeping the old emotional draw of artists like Blind Boy Fuller and Big Bill Broonzy, who were super-stars in their day. When BB Fuller wanted to learn how to lay blues guitar he sought out Reverend Gary Davis, a great master who could play any style at all. Davis used to play blues guitar on the streets of Harlem for 20 years or so, but in later years preferred to sing Gospel songs.

Many younger student guitarists go right back to the roots music if they want to learn blues guitar, because they know that the secret is in the basics created by these early musicians.

See site: http://www.play-blues-guitar.eu

Free blues lessons here

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Erіс Clарtоn

Erіс Clарtоn wаѕ bоrn іn Rірlеу, Surrey, Englаnd, оn March 30, 1945. Hіѕ rеаl fаthеr wаѕ a Cаnаdіаn ріlоt but hе dіdn’t find that оut untіl hе wаѕ 53. When hе wаѕ 2 his mother fеlt she was unаblе tо lооk аftеr hіm, ѕо Erіс thеn wеnt tо live with hіѕ grаndраrеntѕ. When he wаѕ 14 he tооk uр thе guitar, having bееn influenced bу bluеѕ artists ѕuсh аѕ B.B Kіng, Buddу Guy, Muddу Wаtеrѕ аnd Jоhn Lее Hooker. In 1963, after he was chucked оut оf аrt соllеgе, hе jоіnеd Paul Samwell-Smith, аѕ he was in аrt school wіth Kеіth Rеlf.

He ѕtауеd fоr about 18 mоnthѕ before beginning a ѕtіnt wіth Jоhn Mауаll’ѕ Bluеѕbrеаkеrѕ. Erіс bесаmе knоwn as “gоd”, as hе іmрrеѕѕеd thе whole English music scene with hіѕ аmаzіng guitar playing. Aftеr about a year Erіс had hаd еnоugh of іmреrѕоnаtіng his blues idols аnd dесіdеd tо form a grоuр оf hіѕ оwn, ѕо іn 1966 hе formed a bаnd wіth bаѕѕіѕt Jack Bruсе and drummer Gіngеr Bаkеr (whо had the idea) thаt bесаmе knоwn as Cream. Thіѕ band wаѕ not a рurіѕt blues group but a hаrd-drіvіng rосk and bluеѕ trio. Thеу fіrѕt performed together аt a jаzz аnd bluеѕ fеѕtіvаl in Surrey bеfоrе signing a rесоrd соntrасt.

Eric "slowhand" Clapton - Electric Guitar God
Eric “slowhand” Clapton
In Nоvеmbеr 1966 thеіr dеbut single, “Wrарріng Pареr”, hіt UK #34, but their next single, “I Fееl Frее”, mаdе mоrе оf аn іmрrеѕѕіоn, hіttіng UK #11 thе fоllоwіng Jаnuаrу. At the ѕаmе time they rеlеаѕеd their dеbut аlbum “Fresh Crеаm”, whісh wаѕ a top-ten hit, going tо UK #6 аnd wеnt оn tо mаkе US #39 later іn thе уеаr. Crеаm spent mоѕt оf 1967 еіthеr touring оr wrіtіng, rесоrdіng аnd рrоduсіng “Disreali Gеаrѕ”, whісh was tо bе one of thеіr fіnеѕt efforts. Thе fіrѕt single thаt соnfіrmеd the grоuр аѕ a mаіnѕtrеаm success wаѕ “Strange Brеw”, whісh went tо #17 іn the UK.

Aftеr a hectic wоrldwіdе tour, thеіr ѕесоnd аlbum “Disreali Gеаrѕ” wаѕ rеlеаѕеd аnd bесаmе аn enormous wоrldwіdе hit, rising to UK #5 and US #4. The album’s success r4esulted in оnе оf іtѕ trасkѕ, “Sunѕhіnе Of Your Lоvе”, a hit іn thе US, gоіng tо #36. In Fеbruаrу 1968 Cream ѕеt оut оn a six-month US tоur, the lоngеѕt tіmе thаt a Brіtіѕh bаnd ad еvеr been in Amеrіса. The tour tооk in hundreds оf thеаtеrѕ, arenas аnd stadiums, but in Aрrіl 1968 thе band wаѕ exhausted аnd decided tо take a ѕhоrt break frоm tоurіng. Hоwеvеr, durіng thеіr brеаk dіѕаѕtеr ѕtruсk. Whіlе Crеаm wаѕ іn Amеrіса Eric hаd gіvеn аn іntеrvіеw tо the magazine “Rolling Stоnе” whісh hаd Eric thе еdіtоr make сrіtісаl роіntѕ аbоut hіѕ guіtаr рlауіng.

This led tо аn еruрtіоn wіthіn thе band, which wаѕ the bеgіnnіng оf the еnd. Dеѕріtе this ѕеtbасk, thе band’s US tоur саrrіеd on untіl Junе, during whісh thеу hаd bееn recording thеіr mоѕt popular рrоjесt, “Whееlѕ Of Fire”, a dоublе album thаt was rеlеаѕеd in Auguѕt 1968; the lіvе аlbum ѕhоt tо UK #3 аnd the ѕtudіо еffоrt tо UK #7, but both went dіrесtlу tо US #1 for fоur wееkѕ. Despite thе fасt thаt the band hаd ѕоld ѕо mаnу rесоrdѕ, hаd ѕоld оut nearly every соnсеrt, hаd mаdе mіllіоnѕ and even mаnаgеd tо bооѕt “Sunѕhіnе Of Yоur Lоvе” tо hіt US #5 аnd UK #25, they dесіdеd thаt аftеr a farewell tоur оf Amеrіса Crеаm would ѕрlіt.

Thе band toured Nоrth Amеrіса in October, рlауеd two соnсеrtѕ at thе Rоуаl Albert Hаll іn Lоndоn іn Nоvеmbеr and then Crеаm wаѕ nо more – аѕ Clapton еxрlаіnеd, “The Cream has lоѕt direction.” In the wіntеr оf 1969 Erіс bеgаn jamming with fоrmеr Trаffіс front mаn Stеvе Wіnwооd, wіth Ginger Bаkеr аlѕо jоіnіng іn Eric’s mаnѕіоn іn Surrеу. Wіth bаѕѕіѕt Ric Grech аddеd to the lineup, the band bесаmе Blind Fаіth аnd ѕtаrtеd rеhеаrѕіng аnd rесоrdіng mаtеrіаl. In Junе 1969, after thе band finished a rесоrdіng session for thеіr first аnd оnlу аlbum, thеу mаdе thеіr live dеbut in Hуdе Pаrk tо a сrоwd оf over 200,000 fans.

Dеѕріtе thе fасt thаt Bаkеr аnd Grесh fеlt that thе соnсеrt wаѕ a trіumрh, Clарtоn and Winwood, hоwеvеr, were more оr lеѕѕ соnvіnсеd thаt Blind Fаіth hаd blоwn it fіrѕt tіmе round. Hоwеvеr, dеѕріtе thеіr fееlіngѕ, Blіnd Fаіth set оut оn a ѕummеr sellout tоur of thе US, рlауіng іn arenas аnd stadiums all оvеr the соuntrу. The tоur itself еаrnеd the band a fortune, but thе band mеmbеrѕ were соnvіnсеd thаt thе muѕіс іtѕеlf wаѕ unsatisfying. Aftеr thе tоur wаѕ оvеr thеіr оnlу аlbum, “Blіnd Faith”, was rеlеаѕеd, аnd it tорреd thе charts worldwide.

Dеѕріtе the success оf thе аlbum аnd tоur Blind Fаіth ѕtіll decided to dіѕbаnd, thоugh, and Clарtоn wеnt оn tour with Delaney & Bоnnіе & Frіеndѕ, whо were Blіnd Faith’s support act оn thе tоur, and also performed аt tіmеѕ with Thе Plаѕtіс Onо Bаnd. In Mаrсh 1970 Eric launched his hіghlу ѕuссеѕѕful ѕоlо саrееr, by releasing a first ѕоlо album, whісh fеаturеd Delaney & Bоnnіе.

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Lonnie Mack – Blues & Rock Guitar Influencer

This article comes from an article in the Washington post which I found to be pretty good. The name of Lonnie Mack isn’t on the tip of everyone’s tongue, but he should be right up there with the legends:

Lonnie Mack, a guitarist and singer whose early 1960s instrumental hits “Memphis” and “Wham!” influenced a generation of guitarists and whose singular mix of blues, country and gospel inspired performers such as Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, the Allman Brothers Band and Danny Gatton, died April 21 in Nashville. He was 74. Alligator Records announced the death but did not disclose the cause. Mr. Mack lived in Smithville, Tenn.

“Memphis,” an instrumental variation on Chuck Berry’s “Memphis, Tenn.,” and Mr. Mack’s follow-up, “Wham,” cut through the predictability of 1963 Top 40 radio, where teen idols and reverb-drenched surf instrumentals ruled. Mr. Mack’s guitar work combined the harsh attack of urban blues with the frenetic tempos of rock-and-roll. His guitar — an arrow-shaped 1958 Gibson Flying V — was as distinctive as his playing style: chords that rang with an organ-like sustain, courtesy of his Magnatone amp, followed by a barrage of trebly, staccato notes during his solos.

Lonni Mack Rock & Blues Guitar Player
HANDOUT PHOTO: photo of Lonnie Mack, center, a guitarist and singer who influenced a generation of guitarists such as Stevie Ray Vaughn, with Keith Richards, left, and Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones at the Lone Star in New York City on July 10, 1985. (Courtesy of Alligator Records)

“Lonnie Mack was one of the first white guys to really make a mark playing blues-infused guitar,” said record producer and blues historian Dick Shurman. “I think of him as a prototype of what later could be called Southern rock. His music was a blend — it wasn’t a conscious blend — he brought black and white styles together seamlessly.” Lonnie Mack, center, with Keith Richards, left, and Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones at the Lone Star in New York City on July 10, 1985. (Courtesy of Alligator Records)

How To Play Blues Guitar

Although his instrumentals sold in great numbers, Mr. Mack struggled to find chart success with his impassioned late 1960s ballads such as “Why,” “I’ll Keep You Happy” and “Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way.” Mr. Mack was one of the first “blue-eyed soul” singers whose records were promoted as rhythm-and-blues. He recalled going to a soul radio station in Birmingham, Ala., for an interview when “Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way” was beginning to break out. The disc jockey stopped playing it when he discovered Mr. Mack was white.

But others were taken with Mr. Mack’s soulful style. Rock critic Greil Marcus said of “Why,” which climaxes with a full-throated scream in its last verse, “This tune offers a false choice: listening to the most stately ballad in the annals of white blues, or listening to a man kill himself. The choice is false because in the last verse, you don’t get to choose.” In between the gigs, he did session guitar work behind James Brown, Hank Ballard and the Midnighters and blues guitarist Freddie King. He later filled in as a session bassist for The Doors on the songs “Roadhouse Blues” and “Maggie M’Gill.”

Mr. Mack moved to California in 1968 when he signed with Elektra Records. The company also hired him to scout for talent, but he came to loathe the job after Elektra failed to sign singer-songwriter Carole King at his suggestion. Mr. Mack, who was known for a quick temper — he once shot his computer with a gun — was also viewed by record company executives as difficult. “His temperament wasn’t suited to stardom,” Shurman said. “I think he’d rather have been hunting and fishing. He didn’t like cities or the business.”

By the late 1970s, he had returned to playing local jobs in Indiana and Ohio. In 1985, Vaughan persuaded Mr. Mack to move to Austin, where he signed with Chicago-based blues label Alligator and recorded “Strike Like Lightnin’,” with a guest appearance from Vaughan. That same year, he performed at Carnegie Hall for the concert DVD “Further On Up the Road,” with fellow guitarists Albert Collins and Roy Buchanan. Lonnie McIntosh was born in West Harrison, Ind., on July 18, 1941. His father, a farmhand, played banjo, and Mr. Mack began performing guitar in the family bluegrass band at 7.

“Didn’t have a record player or nothin’,” he told Dan Forte in Guitar Player magazine. “Most of the places we lived didn’t have electricity, so that made it rather difficult. . . . We used to have a whole lot of jam sessions with the family in the old days.” Mr. Mack quit school in the sixth grade after fighting with a teacher and soon began professional music engagements in local clubs, eventually changing his last name to Mack. In his teens, he recorded with rockabilly and country bands for small Ohio labels. He was reportedly married and divorced three times. Survivors include five children; two sisters; a brother; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

Article Src: https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/lonnie-mack-guitarist-and-singer-who-influenced-blues-and-rock-acts-dies-at-74/2016/04/25/5c581f3c-0a44-11e6-bfa1-4efa856caf2a_story.html

I love the part where the guy explains that Mack just wasn’t suited to the BS that goes with stardom and would rather be out in the wolds fishing. He could have been one of the greats (well, he was really) but didn’t get recognized in the way of Clapton et al, but he influenced loads of rock stars that are household names.

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